Cart:

0 item(s) - CA$0.00
You have no items in your shopping cart.

0

Join us on Facebook to speak herbals teas, supplements and probitotics Join us on Twitter to speak herbals teas, supplements and probitotics Join us on Pinterest to speak herbals teas, supplements and probitotics Join us on LinkedIn to speak herbals teas, supplements and probitotics YouTube, videos about herbals teas, supplements and probitotics

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

(Salvia officinalis)

Use(s) or Purpose(s)

  • Used for excessive perspiration
  • Used for depression, cerebral ischemia and memory enhancement

Risks Information

Caution(s) and Warning(s)
When used orally in high doses, or when used long-term. Some species of sage contain a thujone constituent that can be toxic if enough is consumed.
PREGNANCY: When used orally because the constituent, thujone, can have menstrual stimulant and abortifacient effects.
LACTATION: When used orally; sage is thought to reduce the mother's milk supply.

Contraindication(s)
Some species of sage can cause convulsions. Theoretically, sage might interfere with the effectiveness of anticonvulsant drugs.
Preliminary research suggests sage might have hypoglycemic activity. Theoretically, sage might have additive therapeutic effects and adverse effects with hypoglycemic drugs.
Some constituents of sage have CNS depressant activity. Theoretically, concomitant use with drugs with sedative properties might cause additive effects and side effects.
HERBS AND SUPPLEMENTS WITH HYPOGLYCEMIC POTENTIAL: Theoretically, sage may have additive effects with herbs that decrease blood glucose levels. Herbs with hypoglycemic potential include devil's claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut seed, Panax ginseng, psyllium, and Siberian ginseng.
HERBS AND SUPPLEMENTS WITH SEDATIVE PROPERTIES: Some constituents of sage have CNS depressant activity. Theoretically, concomitant use with herbs that have sedative properties might enhance therapeutic and adverse effects. Some of these supplements include 5-HTP, calamus, California poppy, catnip, hops, Jamaican dogwood, kava, St. John's wort, scullcap, valerian, yerba mansa, and others.
BLOOD GLUCOSE: Preliminary research suggests sage might have hypoglycemic activity.
DIABETES: Preliminary research suggests sage might have hypoglycemic activity. Monitor blood sugar closely.
HYPERTENSION: Sage can increase blood pressure in some people with hypertension. Monitor blood pressure.
SEIZURE DISORDERS: Salvia officinalis contains significant amounts of thujone, a convulsant. Avoid the use of sage in quantities greater than those in food.

Known Adverse Reaction(s)
Orally, sage can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, agitation, and wheezing. It may increase the blood pressure of hypertensive patients. Thujone, which is found in salvia officinalis, is a neurotoxin and can cause seizures. Camphor, which is present in both of these species of sage, can cause hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity in high doses.

We find sage in:

Menopausal

    MENOPAUSAL

References :
Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com
Google Images. http://www.google.ca/images
© 2015 Virage Santé. Tous droits réservés.