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Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

(Achillea millefolium)

Use(s) or Purpose(s)

  • Used for fever, common cold, allergic rhinitis, amenorrhea, dysentery, diarrhea, loss of appetite, mild or spastic gastrointestinal (GI) tract discomfort, and to induce sweating
  • Thrombotic conditions with hypertension, including cerebral and coronary thromboses
  • In combination with other herbs, yarrow is used for bloating, flatulence, mild gastrointestinal (GI) cramping, and nervous gastrointestinal complaints

Risk Information

Caution(s) and Warning(s)
PREGNANCY: When used orally; yarrow is believed to be an abortifacient and affect the menstrual cycle
LACTATION: Insufficient reliable information available; avoid excessive amounts during lactation

Contraindication(s)
- Theoretically, due to reports that yarrow increases stomach acid, yarrow might decrease the effectiveness of antacids
- Theoretically, concomitant use might cause increased effects and adverse effects.
- Theoretically, concomitant use might prolong barbiturate-induced sleep time. Some of these sedative medications include pentobarbital (Nembutal), phenobarbital (Luminal), secobarbital (Seconal), and others.
- Theoretically, due to reports that yarrow increases stomach acid, yarrow might decrease the effectiveness of H2-blockers. The H2 blockers include cimetidine (Tagamet), ranitidine (Zantac), nizatidine (Axid), and famotidine (Pepcid).
- Yarrow is thought to have diuretic properties. Theoretically, due to these potential diuretic effects, yarrow might reduce excretion and increase levels of lithium. The dose of lithium might need to be decreased.
- Theoretically, due to reports that yarrow increases stomach acid, yarrow might decrease the effectiveness of PPIs. PPIs include omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), rabeprazole (Aciphex), pantoprazole (Protonix), and esomeprazole (Nexium).
- ANTICOAGULANT/ANTIPLATELET HERBS AND SUPPLEMENTS: Concomitant use of herbs and supplements that affect platelet aggregation could theoretically increase the risk of bleeding in some people. Some of these herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, and others.
- THUJONE-CONTAINING HERBS: Concomitant use can increase the risk of thujone toxicity. Thujone-containing herbs include oak moss, oriental arborvitae, sage, tansy, thuja (cedar), tree moss, and wormwood; avoid using.
- CROSS-ALLERGENICITY: Yarrow may cause an allergic reaction in individuals sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many other herbs.
- SURGERY: Yarrow has antiplatelet effects. Yarrow might cause excessive bleeding if used perioperatively. Tell patients to discontinue yarrow at least 2 weeks before elective surgical procedures.

Known Adverse Reaction(s)
Orally, large amounts of yarrow might cause sedative and diuretic effects. Topically, yarrow can cause dermatitis. Yarrow may cause an allergic reaction in individuals sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many other herbs.

We find Yarrow in:

Gluco-lib     

       GLUCO-LIB


References :
Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database.
http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com
Google Images.
http://www.google.ca/images
© 2015 Virage Santé. Tous droits réservés.